ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Samuel Butler

(1613-1680)


Samuel Butler was born in Worcestershire and may have studied at the King's School, Worcester; he served as a private secretary before marrying and publishing the first part of Hudibras in 1663. He was secretary to the Duke of Buckingham (1670-74). While Butler's unsuccessful attempts at preferment became the matter of legend, Hudibras was imitated in hundreds of seventeenth and eighteenth-century burlesque poems. William Hazlitt remarked, "He has exhausted the moods and figures of satire and sophistry. His rhymes are as witty as his reasons."


TEXT RECORDS:

1664Hudibras.
1668 ca.A Squire of Dames.

PUBLICATIONS:

Mola asinaria by William Prynne. 1659.
The Lord Roos his answer to the Marquess of Dorchester's letter. 1660.
Hudibras: the first part. 1663.
Hudibras: the second part. 1664.
To the memory of the most renowned Du-Vall. 1671.
Two letters. 1672.
Hudibras: the third and last part. 1678.
Cydippe her answer to Acontius. In Ovid's epistles, 1680.
Mercurius Menippeus: the loyal satirist. 1682.
The plagiary exposed: or an answer to a newly revived calumny against the memory of King Charles I. 1691.
The posthumous works. 1715-17, 1732, 1734.
Genuine remains in verse and prose, ed. R. Thyer. 1759.
Complete works, ed. A. R. Waller and Rene Lamar. 3 vols, 1905-28.
Satires and miscellaneous poetry and prose, ed. R. Lamar. 1928.
Characters, ed. Charles W. Daves. 1970.
Hudibras, ed. John Wilders. 1967.
Prose observations, ed. de Quehen. 1979.