ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Lord Chesterfield

(1694-1773)


Philip Dormerm Stanhope, Lord Chesterfield entered Trinity College Cambridge as a fellow-commoner in 1712 (M.A. 1714). He was Whig M.P. for St Germans (1715) and Lostwithiel (1722-25); he succeeded to the peerage 1726, and played an important role in mid-century politics. Chesterfield was a friend of Pope and Henrietta Howard; he contributed to The World and corresponded with Voltaire, and was made infamous by Samuel Johnson when Chesterfield failed to support his labors on the Dictionary (1755). He is best known for the frank series of educational letters written to his natural son which came to epitomize everything Victorian writers disliked about the eighteenth century.


TEXT RECORDS:

1748[Letter of September 27, 1748; on archaisms.]

PUBLICATIONS:

Letters to his son, Philip Stanhope. 1774.
Miscellaneous works. 2 vols, 1777; 3 vols. 1777; 4 vols, 1779.
Letters to Alderman George Faulkner, Dr. Madden, Mr. Sexton, Mr. Derrick and the Earl of Arran. 1777.
Characters of eminent personages of his own time. 1777, 1778.
Poetical works. 1927.