ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Walter Churchey

(1747-1805)


Walter Churchey was an attorney who in 1771 began a correspondence with John Wesley. He sent his poems to William Cowper, who recommended publication, with disastrous results. in 1789 Churchey published a long letter in the Gentleman's Magazine defending the character of John Henderson, who had been Joseph Cottle's tutor. Cottle later published a humorous sketch describing Churchey as an impoverished and embittered poetaster.


TEXT RECORDS:

1764Ode to Pity. Written at 17; in imitation of Collins.
1789An Epitaph, in the manner of Grey.
1789An Ode upon Odes; or, an Essay on Modern Pindarics: in imitation of Dryden's Alexander's Feast.
1789The Chamber of Death, in the manner of Spencer.
1804The Passions. An Ode for Music ... with considerable Additions.

PUBLICATIONS:

Poems and imitations of the British poets. 1789.
Lines on the death of the Rev. John Wesley, M.A. 1791.
A remarkable scene, or open vision, actually seen near Hay, in Breconshire. 1795.
An elegy to the memory of William Cowper, Esq. 1800.
An essay on man: upon principles opposite to those of Lord Bolingbroke. 1804.
The Passions. An Ode for Music [Collins, with additions by Churchey]. 1804.
An apology, by W. Churchey, for his public appearance as a poet. 1805.