ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. Chauncy Hare Townshend

(1798-1868)


Chauncy Hare Townshend, the wealthy son of Henry Hare Townsend, was educated at Eton (1811-15) and Trinity College, Cambridge (B.A. 1821, M.A. 1824) where he won a college prize for his "Jerusalem." He was ordained, though never took a living. He began corresponding with Robert Southey in 1816, and afterwards knew Wordsworth. Townsend spent much of his life living in Switzerland, where he collected art and coins. He was a close friend of Charles Dickens, who agreed to act as his literary executor. He altered the spelling of his name to "Townshend" in 1828.


TEXT RECORDS:

1821Lines, composed during an early Morning Walk.

PUBLICATIONS:

Jerusalem: a poem which obtained the Chancellor's Medal at the Cambridge commencement, July 1817. 1817.
Poems. 1821.
The weaver's boy, a tale; and other poems. 1825.
The reigning vice: a satirical essay in four books. 1827.
Facts in mesmerism, with reasons for a dispassionate inquiry into it. 1840.
A descriptive tour in Scotland. 1846.
Sermons in sonnets: with a text on the new year and other poems. 1851.
The burning of the Amazon. 1852.
Mesmerism proved true, and the Quarterly reviewer reviewed. 1854.
The three gates: In verse. 1859.
Religious opinions of the late reverend Chauncy Hare Townshend. 1869.