ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. Laurence Eusden

(1688-1730)


Laurence Eusden, the most obscure of the poet laureates, took his M.A. from Trinity College Cambridge in 1712 and was made a Fellow; he contributed to the Spectator and the Guardian, published translations from Claudian and Statius in Steele's Miscellanies (1714) and wrote occasional verse. The Rector of Coningsby, Eusden was given the laureateship at the behest of the Duke of Newcastle (1717). Several of his poems are collected in the fourth volume of John Nichols's Select Collection (1780-84).


TEXT RECORDS:

1727A Poem humbly inscrib'd to the Queen.

PUBLICATIONS:

A letter to Mr. Addison. 1714.
Verses at the last publick commencement at Cambridge. 1714.
A poem on the marriage of his grace the Duke of Newcastle. 1717.
A poem to her royal highness on the birth of the prince. 1717.
An ode for the birthday, as it was sung before his majesty. 1720.
An ode for the new year, as it was sung before his majesty. 1720.
To her highness the Princess Anne, on her recovery from the small-pox. 1720.
An ode for the new year, as it was sung before his majesty. 1721.
An ode for the birthday MDCCXXI, as it was sung before his majesty. 1721.
The parallel, with a dedication to ... Lord Carteret. 1722.
Three poems. 1722.
An ode for the birthday MDCCXXIII, as it was sung before his majesty. 1723.
The origin of the knigts of the Bath, a poem. 1725.
To Mr. John Saunders, on seeing his paintings in Cambridge. 1725.
An epistle to ... Sir Robert Walpole. 1726.
Three poems. 1727.
A poem humbly inscribed to his royal highness Prince Frederic. 1729.
Hero and Leander: a poem by Museaus. 1750.