ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

William Melmoth

(1710-1799)


The son of a notable lawyer of the same name, William Melmoth attended Westminster and Lincoln's Inn before entering Magdalene College Cambridge as a pensioner in 1726. He was Commissioner of Bankrupts (1756) before retiring to Bath in 1769. Melmoth translated Pliny and Cicero and contributed to The World, Dodsley's Collection of Poetry, and its supplements. His Fitzosborne Letters went through ten editions. Melmoth married the daughter of the Tory poet, William King of Oxford (1685-1763).

TEXT RECORDS:

1748Letter LXXII. [The Transformation of Lycon and Euphormius.]
1748Letter LXXIII. To Clytander. [Concerning the use of the Antient Mythology in Modern Poetry.]
1748The Transformation of Lycon and Euphormius.

PUBLICATIONS:

Letters of Pliny the Consul. 2 vols, 1746.
Dialogus de Oratoribus [Tactitus, trans.] 1748.
Letters of of the late Sir Thomas Fitzosborne, bart. on several subjects. 1748.
The letters of Marcus Tullius Cicero, to several of his friends, with remarks. 3 vols, 1750.
A dialogue concerning the rise and decline of eloquence among the Romans. [trans.] 1757.
Cato, or an Essay on Old Age [Cicero, trans.] 1773.
Laelius, or an essay on friendship. 1777.
The translator of Pliny's Letters vindicated from the Objections of Jacob Bryant. 1794.