ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. Richard Jago

(1715-1781)


The son of Richard Jago, rector of Beaudesert in Warwickshire, Richard Jago studied with at the grammar school at Solihull where he met his longtime friend William Shenstone (William Somervile was another friend). Jago entered University College Oxford as a servitor in 1732 (B.A. 1736, M.A. 1739). He was vicar of Kimcote (1746) before obtaining the living at Snitterfield (1754) from Lord Clare, afterwards Earl of Nugent. Jago contributed several poems to Dodsley's Collection; his once-famous elegy on blackbirds was published in The Adventurer as by Gilbert West.


TEXT RECORDS:

1758The Scavengers. A Town Eclogue. In the Manner of Swift.

PUBLICATIONS:

The causes of impenitence consider'd. 1755.
The nature and grounds of a Christian's happiness ... in death. A sermon. 1763.
Edge-Hill, or the rural prospect delineated and moralized: a poem. 1765.
Labor and genius: a fable. 1768.
Poems, moral and descriptive. 1784.
William Shenstone, Letters, ed. Marjorie Williamson. 1939.