ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

John Hawkesworth

(1720-1773)


John Hawkesworth grew up in a family of dissenters and was an attorney's clerk before taking up a career as a writer; he was an early friend of Samuel Johnson and a collaborator with Johnson and Joseph Warton on the Adventurer (1752-54). Hawkesworth contributed a number of poems to the Gentleman's Magazine under the name "H. Greville" (1741-49) and reviewed extensively for the Monthly Review (1768-1771). George Saintsbury once described him as "The great ape of Johnson."


TEXT RECORDS:

1747An Ode to Hope.
1747The Accident; a Pastoral Essay.
1765Some Account of a Collection of Old Ballads; lately published in 3 Volumes in 12mo. by Thomas Percy.

PUBLICATIONS:

The works of Jonathan Swift. 12 vols, 1754-55.
Amphitryon: or the two Sosias altered from Dryden. 1756.
Oroonoko, by Thomas Southern, with alterations. 1759.
Edgar and Emmaline: a fairy tale in a dramatic entertainment. 1761.
Almoran and Hamet: an Oriental tale. 2 vols, 1761.
Letters written by Jonathan Swift. 3 vols, 1766.
An account of the voyages undertaken in the Southern Hemisphere. 3 vols, 1773.
The fall of Egypt, an oratorio. 1774.
Zimri, an oratorio. 1780?
The fair Circassian. A tragedy. 1781.