ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

William Vernon

(1735-1781 fl.)


William Vernon received little education; he gave up an apprenticeship to a buckle-maker to enlist in the army. At Winchester (where he was living by November 1757) he met the Wartons, who encouraged him to write poetry. Samuel Johnson, who likely had it from Joseph Warton, sent a copy of his "Parish Clerk" to William Shenstone. Vernon also published in the Gentleman's Magazine. After being discharged from the army he worked as a corrector for the press in London. A poem by Vernon appeared in Lloyd's Evening Post in August 1762 dated "Belleisle, June 12, 1761"; a poem in the St. James's Chronicle of 22 September 1781 describes Vernon as "the noted Buckle-Maker of Wolverhampton."


TEXT RECORDS:

1758Horace Book IV. Ode IX. imitated.
1759The Parish Clerk. A Poem.

PUBLICATIONS:

Poems on several occasions. 1758.