ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Thomas Nashe

(1567-1601)


The son of a Suffolk clergyman, Thomas Nashe attended St. John's College Cambridge as a sizar (B.A. 1586); he resided at Cambridge for some seven years before being expelled. He traveled on the continent before settling in London (1588) where he pursued patronage and further controversy. Nashe was a friend of Lyly, Lodge, and Greene; he admired Spenser but engaged in a long and bitter dispute with Spenser's friend Gabriel Harvey. Nashe was imprisoned for criticizing theatrical abuses in The Isle of Dogs (1597).


TEXT RECORDS:

1589To the Gentlemen Students of both Universities.
1592Pierce Penilesse his Supplication to the Divell.
1592Strange Newes.
1596Have with you to Saffron-Walden.

PUBLICATIONS:

The anatomie of absurditie. 1589.
"To the gentlemen students of both universities, in Menaphon [Greene]. 1589.
An almond for a parrot. 1590.
Pierce Peniless his supplication to the Divell. 1592.
Strange newes, of the intercepting certaine letters. 1592.
Christs teares over Jerusalem. 1593.
The terrors of the night: or a discourse on apparitions. 1594.
The unfortunate traveller: or the life of Jacke Wilton. 1594.
Have with you to Saffron-Walden; or Gabriel Harveys hunt is up. 1596.
Nashe's lenten stuffe: the praise of red herring. 1599.
A pleasant comedie called Summers last will and testament. 1600.
Works, ed. A. B. Grosart. 6 vols, 1881-85.
The choise of valentines, ed. J. S. Farmer. 1899.
Works, ed. R. B. McKerrow. 5 vols, 1904-10.
Works, ed. F. P. Wilson, 5 vols, 1958.