ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. John Ogilvie

(1733-1813)


The son of a clergyman, John Ogilvie was born at Aberdeen and educated at Marischal College (M.A. 1759, D.D. 1766); he was minister of Midmar, Aberdeenshire (1759-1814). A fellow of the Royal Society, Edinburgh, Ogilvie was acquainted with James Beattie and Samuel Johnson. He was for a time a popular minor poet; his odes were admired while his longer works fell stillborn from the press.


TEXT RECORDS:

1758Ode to Sleep.
1759Ode to Time, occasioned by seeing the Ruins of an Old Castle.
1762Ode to Evening.
1762Ode to Innocence.
1765Solitude: or the Elysium of the Poets, a Vision.
1765Solitude: or, the Elysium of the Poets: Introduction.

PUBLICATIONS:

The day of judgment: a poem. 1759.
The day of judgment ... to which are added ... odes. 1759.
Poems on several subjects. 1762; 1764.
Observations on the cause and consequences of prejudices against religion. A sermon. 1764.
Providence. An allegorical poem in three books. 1764.
Solitude: or, the Elysium of the poets: a vision; to which is subjoined an elegy. 1765.
Six sermons on several subjects. 1767.
Paradise. A poem. 1769.
Poems on several subjects. 2 vols, 1769.
Philosophical and critical observations on the nature, characters, and various species of composition. 2 vols, 1774.
Rona: a poem in seven books. 1777.
An inquiry into the causes for the infidelity and scepticism of the times. 1783.
Fane of the druids; a poem. 1784.
Fane of the druids. Book second. 1789.
The theology of Plato, compared with the principles of Oriental and Grecian Philosophers. 1793.
Britannia, a national epic poem, in twenty books. 1801.
The triumphs of Christianity over deism. 1805.
An examination of the evidence from prophecy on behalf of the Christian religion. 1803.