ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

John Cunningham

(1729-1773)


John Cunningham was born in Dublin, the son of a wine-cooper. He attended grammar school for a time, before, after some early success as a poet, abandoning his family to become a strolling player in England. His career as a provincial actor was centered in Edinburgh and Newcastle. Cunningham acquired reputation as a pastoral poet, and he corresponded for a time with William Shenstone.


TEXT RECORDS:

1760Damon and Phillis.
1761An Elegy on a Pile of Ruins.
1761Day: a Pastoral.
1761On May, wrote in April, 1761.
1763Content. A Pastoral.
1763Corydon: a Pastoral. To the Memory of William Shenstone, Esq.
1763Phyllis. A Pastoral.
1763Pomona. A Pastoral.
1765Fortune: an Apologue.
1766A Pastoral, (not published before).
1766Holyday Gown.
1769The Respite: a Pastoral.

PUBLICATIONS:

Love in a mist: a farce. 1747.
A poetical essay in the manner of elegy on the death of his Majesty. 1760.
Day and other pastorals. 1761.
An elegy on a pile of ruins. 1761.
The contemplatist: a night piece. 1762.
Fortune: an apologue. 1765.
Poems chiefly pastoral. 1766.
Poetical works. 1771.
Poetical works. 1795.
Poems of Goldsmith and Cunningham. 1807.
Poetical works. 1808.