1769 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Gervase Markham

James Granger, in Biographical History of England (1769; 1824) 3:161.



Gervase Markham was son of Robert Markham, of Cotham, in the county of Nottingham, esq. He bore a captain's commission in the civil war, and was justly reputed a man of courage [this is another Markham]. He was a practitioner of horsemanship and husbandry, for at least fifty years, and composed several treatises on both these subjects. His books of Farriery have given place to those of Gibson, Soleysell, Bourdon, and Bracken; but they are still in the hands of farriers in the country. We see Markham's, Aristotle's, and several other "Master Pieces," in almost every list of chapmen's books. He was author of a tragedy, entitled, Herod and Antipater, 1621, of a book of angling. The Art of Archerie, and the Soldier's Exercise.