1690 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Thomas Freeman

Anthony Wood, Athenae Oxonienses (1690-91; 1721) 1:397-98.



THOMAS FREEMAN, a Gloucestershire Man born, of the same Family with those of Batsford and Todenham near to Morton in Marsh, became a Student in Magd. Coll. an. 1607, aged 16 years, or thereabouts, and Bach. of Arts four years after. At length retiring to the great City, and setting up for a Poet, was shortly after held in esteem by Sam. Daniel, Owen the Epigrammatist, Dr. Joh. Donn, Shakespeare, George Chapman, Tho. Heywood the Playmaker, and others. To some of whose judgments he submitted these his two Books of Epigrams following.

Rub and a great Cast. In 100 Epigrams. Lond. 1614 qu.

Run and a great Cast. The second bowl, in an 100 Epigrams — Printed with the former Epigrams, and both dedicated to Thomas Lord Windsor, who seemed to patronize his Studies. The reason for Rub and Run, he gives in these four Verses,

Sphera mihi, calamus; mundi sunt crimina nodi,
Ipse sed est mundus Sphaeromachia mihi.
Sive manere jubes, Lector, seu currere sphaerum
Lusori pariter, curre manque placent.