1691 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Shakerley Marmion

Gerard Langbaine, in Account of the English Dramatick Poets (1691) 345-46.



SHAKERLEY MARMION, a Gentleman born in the Reign of King Charles the First, at Ainoe, (in Sutton Hundred) in the County of Northampton, about the beginning of January, A. D. 1602. He was bred up at Thame-School, in Oxfordshire, and at fifteen Years of Age was sent to the University of Oxford, where he became a Member of Wadham Colledge, and in 1624. he took his Master of Arts Degree. What further became of him, I know not, all that I am able to inform the Reader, is, that he was the Author of three Comedies, which have formerly been well approv'd, viz.

Antiquary, a Comedy, acted by her Majesties Servants at the Cock-piet, and printed quarto Lond. 1641. Aurelio's declaring is Marriage to the Duke and Leonardo, from Lucretia's Lodging, where he got in by her Maid's Assistance, is an Incident (as I have already shew'd) in several Plays.

Fine Companion, a Comedy acted before the King and Queen at Whitehall, and sundery times with great applause at the Private House in Salisbury-court, by the Prince's Servants; printed quarto Lond. 1633. and dedicated to the truly Noble, and his worthy Kinsman in all respects, Sir Ralph Dutton. The Reader will find that Captain Porpuss, in Sir Barnaby Whig, is beholding to Captain Whibble in his Play, for some of his Expressions.

Holland's Leaguer, an Excellent Comedy, often acted with great Applause, by the High and Mighty Charles his Servants, at the Private House in Salisbury-court, printed quarto Lond. 1632. The Author in this Play has shewed his Reading, having borrow'd several things from Juvenal, Petronius Arbyter, &c.

Mr. Winstanley has made no mention of our Author, and Mr. Philips to prove his Character of him, that he is not an Obscure or Uncopious Writer of English Comedy, has ascrib'd two Comedies to him, which belong to other Men; the Fleire being writ by Edward Sharpham, and the Fair Maid of the Exchange (if we may believe Kirkman's Account) by Thomas Heywood.