1690 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. Samuel Woodford

Anthony Wood, Athenae Oxonienses (1690-91; 1721) 2:1098-99.



SAMUEL WOODFORD, the eldest Son of Rob. Woodford of the antient Borough of Northampton, Gent. was born in the Parish of Allhallowes in the Wall in London, on the 15th of April an. 1636, became a Commoner of Wadham Coll. in 1653, took one degree in Arts in 1656, and two Years after he retired to the Inner-Temple, where he was Chamber-Fellow with Tho. Flatman the Poet. After the Restoration of K. Ch. II. he lived at Aldbrook, and afterwards at Bensted in Hampshire in a married and secular Condition, and was about that time a Member of the Royal Society. On the 14th of the cal. of Jan. an. 1659, he took holy Orders from George Bishop of Winchester, and soon after became Rector of Hartley-Malduit in the same County by the favour of Sir Nich. Stuart Bt. On the 27th of May 1675 he was installed Preb. of Chichester, in the latter end of 1677 or thereabouts, he was [m]ade Doct. of Div. by the Diploma of Will. Archb. of Canterbury, and on the 8th of Nov. 1680 he was installed Preb. of Winchester, by the Favour of his great Patron the Bishop of Winchester before-mention'd. He hath written

A Poem on the Return of K. Ch. II. an. 1660. — This I have not yet seen.

Paraphrase upon the Psalms of David, in 5 Books. Lond. 1667 qu. there again in 1678 in oct; written in the Pindaric, vulgarly so called, and other various sorts of Verses. This Paraphrase is commended for a good Piece by Mr. Richard Baxter, and by others as an incomparable Version, especially by the Author's Friend Thom. Flatman, who hath written a Pindaric Ode on it.

Paraphrase on the Canticles, Lond. 1679, oct. on which Mr. Flatman hath also written an excellent Copy of Verses. With this Paraphrase are printed (1) The Legend of Love, in 3 Cantoes. (2) To the Muse, Ode Pindarique. (3) A Paraphrase upon some select Hymnes of the New and Old Testament. (4) Occasional Compositions in English Rhimes, with some Translations out of Lat. Gr. Spanish and Italian, but chiefly out of the last. Some of which Compositions and Translations were before falsely published by a too curious Collector of them from very false Copies, against the Will and Knowledge of the Author. He complains that several of his Translations of some of the Moral Odes of Horace had been printed, after the same uncorrect Manner.