1719 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Richard Savage

Giles Jacob, in Poetical Register: or the Lives and Characters of the English Dramatick Poets (1719) 297-98.



This Gentleman is a Natural Son of the late Earl Rivers, by the Countess of Macclesfield (now Widow of the late Colonel Bret) she being divorc'd by the House of Lords from the Earl of Macclesfield on Account of his Birth. Earl Rivers himself stood Godfather, gave him his own Name, and saw it enter'd accordingly into the Register-Book of St. Andrew's Holborn; and for whom, no doubt, he would have liberally provided, had not some unfair Methods been put in practice to deceive him, by a false Report of his Son's Death.

To his own Mother he has not been the least oblig'd for his Education, but to her Mother the Lady Mason; she committed him to the Care of Mrs. Lloyd his Godmother, who, dying before he was Ten Years old, out of her tender Regard, left him a Legacy of 300 which was embezzled by her Executors.

Under all these Misfortunes, this Gentleman having a Genius for Dramatick Studies, gave us Two Plays between the Age of Nineteen and Twenty-One.

I. Woman's a Riddle; a Comedy, acted at the Theatre in Lincoln's-Inn-Field, 1716. Dedicated to the Marquis of Wharton. The Story is taken from a Spanish Play, call'd, La Dama Duende.

II. Love in a Veil; a Comedy, acted at the Theatre Royal in Drury-Lane, 1718, with Applause. Dedicated to the Lord Lansdown. The Story from a Spanish Play, call'd, Peor esta que estava.

To the first of these Comedies, the Author, being unacquainted with the Management of the Stage, permitted Mr. C. Bullock to Dedicate it, and put his Name to the Title-Page, on account of some few Alterations he procur'd to be made in the Performance.