1832 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Allan Cunningham

William Clarke and Robert Shelton Mackenzie, in The Georgian Era: Memoirs of the most eminent Persons who have flourished in Great Britain (1832-34) 3:585.



ALLAN CUNNINGHAM, the son of humble parents, was born in Scotland, about 1786; and, after having received an ordinary school education, was apprenticed to a stone mason, and for some years, followed that business. His poetical taste, which he early developed, attracted the notice and patronage of Sir Walter Scott; and he was already favourably known to the public as an author, when he was selected by Mr. Chantry, as a sort of superintendent and assistant in the studio of that eminent sculptor. Mr. Cunningham's principal works are, Sir Marmaduke Maxwell; The Mermaid of Galloway; The Legend of Richard Faulder; and twenty Scottish songs; four volumes of Songs of Scotland, ancient and modern, with introduction and notes; and Lives of the British Architects, Painters and Sculptors.