1843 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. Joseph Hulbert Nichols

Charles W. Everest, in Poets of Connecticut (1843) 339.



The Rev. JOSEPH HULBERT NICHOLS was born on the 20th of August, 1805, at Newtown, in Fairfield County, where his early boyhood was passed. When he was about ten years of age, his parents removed to the city of New York. He was fitted for college by the Rev. Dr. BRONSON, at the Episcopal Academy, of Cheshire, and was graduated at Yale College, in 1825. After leaving college, Mr. NICHOLS commenced the study of the law, in the office of SETH P. STAPLES, Esq., of New York, and was also for some time a member of the Law School at Litchfield, under Judge GOULD. He was admitted to the bar at Albany, in October, 1828. In the spring of the following year he became a student in divinity, and in the ensuing autumn entered the Middle Class of the General Episcopal Theological Seminary, in the city of New York. In July, 1831, he completed his theological course of study, and immediately after was ordained by the Right Rev. Bishop BENJAMIN TREADWELL ONDERDONK.

During the first year of his ministry, Mr. NICHOLS was associated with the late venerable Bishop MOORE, in the charge of the Monumental Church, at Richmond, in Virginia. He was subsequently, for several years, Rector of Christ Church, at Greenwich, in Connecticut; and is now an Assistant Minister of Trinity Church, in New Haven.

The greater part of the published poetical writings of Mr. NICHOLS consists of fugitive compositions, communicated some years since to various periodicals of the day. In August, 1841, he delivered a poem entitled The Future, before the Associate Alumni of Washington College, at Hartford, which was published at their request. Mr. NICHOLS evidently paints from nature, and his poems are pervaded by the sentiments of a warm and affectionate heart. In his occasional allusions to characters and events, and his descriptions of familiar scenes, the reader will recognize some of the qualities of a very high order of poetry.