1812 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. Andrew Macdonald

Alexander Chalmers, in General Biographical Dictionary (1812-17) 21:49-50.



ANDREW MACDONALD, another young writer of considerable talents, was the son of George Donald, a gardener at Leith. The Mac he appended to his name when he came to London. He was born in 1757 at Leith, where he was educated, chiefly by the assistance of bishop Forbes. For some time he had the charge of a chapel at Glasgow, in which city he published a novel, entitled "The Independent." He afterwards came to London, and wrote for the newspapers. His works were lively, satirical, and humorous, and were published under the signature of Matthew Bramble. He naturally possessed a line genius, and had improved his understanding with classical and scientific knowledge; but or want of connections in this southern part of the united kingdom, and a proper opportunity to bring his talents into notice, he was always embarrassed, and had occasionally to struggle with great and accumulated distress. He died in the 33d year of his age, at Kentish Town, in Aug. 1790, leaving a wife and infant daughter in a state of extreme indigence. A volume of his "Miscellaneous Works" was published in 1791, in which were comprised, "The fair Apostate," a tragedy; " Love and Loyalty," an opera; "Princess of Tarento," a comedy; and "Vimonda," a tragedy.