1735 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Nahum Tate

Alexander Pope, in "Epistle to Arbuthnot" (1735); Works, ed. Warton (1796-97) 4:29.



The bard whom pilfer'd pastorals renown,
Who turns a Persian tale for half a crown,
Just writes to make his barrenness appear,
And strains, from hard-bound brains, eight lines a year;
He who still wanting, though he lived on theft,
Steals much, spends little, yet has nothing left:
And he, who now to sense, now nonsense leaning,
Means not, but blunders round about a meaning:
And he whose fustian's so sublimely bad
It is not poetry, but prose run mad:
All these my modest satire bade translate,
And own'd that nine such made a Tate.