1742 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Giles Jacob

Alexander Pope, in The Dunciad (1728; 1742); Works, ed. Warton (1796-97) 5:193-94 & n.



Jacob, the scourge of Grammar, mark with awe,
Nor less revere him, blunderbuss of Law.

Jacob, the scourge of Grammar, mark with awe,] "This 'Gentleman' is son of a 'considerable Master' of Romsey in Southamptonshire, and bred to the law under a 'very eminent Attorney': Who, between his 'more laborious' studies, has 'diverted' himself with Poetry. He is a great admirer of Poets and their works, which has occasioned him to try his genius that way. — He has writ in prose the Lives of the Poest, Essays, and a great many Law-books, The Accomplish'd Conveyancer, Modern Justice," &c. GILES JACOB, of himself, Lives of Poets, vol. i. He very grosly, and unprovoked, abused in that book the Author's Friend, Mr. Gay. Warburton.