1595 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Samuel Daniel

William Covell, in Polimanteia (1595) Sig. R2v-R3.



Let other countries (sweet Cambridge) envie, (yet admire) my Virgil, thy Petrarch, divine Spenser. And unlesse I erre, (a thing easie in such simplicitie) deluded by dearlie beloved Delia, and fortunatelie fortunate Cleopatra; Oxford thou maist extoll thy courte-deare-verse happie Daniell, whose sweet refined muse, in contracted shape, were sufficient amongst men, to gaine pardon of the sinne to Rosemond, pittie to distressed Cleopatra, and everliving praise to her loving Delia. Register your childrens petegree in Fames forehead, so may you fill volumes with Chaucers praise, with Lydgate, the Scottish Knight, and such like, whose unrefined tongues farre shorte of the excellencie of this age, wrote simplie and purelie as the times weare.