1820 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Lodowick Bryskett

John Payne Collier, in Poetical Decameron (1820) 1:99-100.



MORTON. Did Brysket write nothing else [but the Mourning Muse of Thestylis]?

BOURNE. Nothing in verse that has survived; but in a prose work by him, printed in 1606, called A Discourse of civill Life, he talks of "the contentment of his Muses," as if here were familiar with them, as well as their favourite Spenser. This Discourse is a work of moral philosophy, written many years before it was printed, and is conducted in the form of a dialogue, in which Spenser himself bears a part, and is made to speak of his own unfinished Fairy Queen. It is in substance the same as part of what Spenser says in his letter to Sir W. Raleigh.