1789 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. Thomas Twining

William Cowper to Mrs. King, 22 April 1789; Southey, Life and Works of Cowper (1835-37) 6:234-35.



I must not forget to mention that I have received, (probably not without your privity,) Mr. Twining's valuable volume [Aristotle's Treatise on Poetry, translated]. For a long time I supposed it to have come from my bookseller, who now and then sends me a new publication; but I find, on enquiry, that it came not from him. I beg, madam, if your are aware that Mr. Twining himself sent it, or your friend Mr. Martyn, that you will negotiate for me on the occasion, and contrive to convey to the obliging donor my very warmest thanks. I am impatient till he receives them. I have not yet had time to do justice to a writer so sensible, elegant, and entertaining, by a complete perusal of his work; but I have with pleasure sought out all those passages to which Mr. Martyn was so good as to refer me, and am delighted to observe the exact agreement in opinion on the subject of translation in general, and on that of Mr. Pope's in particular, that subsists between Mr. Twining and myself. "Ornament for ever!" cries Pope; "Simplicity for ever!" cries Homer. No two can be more opposite.