1764 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. John Langhorne

Henry James Pye, in Public Advertiser (7 April 1764).



Sir,
By inserting the following Verses in your Paper, occasioned by reading a Copy of Verses in the Poetical Magazine, reflecting on a Gentleman, whose Character I greatly esteem, both as a Poet and a Man, you will oblige
your constant Reader and old Correspondent,
H. P.

When Scandal dares unveil her impious Face,
When Malice boldly seizes Candour's Place;
When Muses unabash'd mean Falshoods urge,
And fell Destruction shakes her snaky Scourge;
O'er Truth's high Fence conceited Dunces bound,
And injur'd Merit feels a venom'd Wound:
In vain Sense throws her Buckler o'er his Breast;
For F[a]wkes has will'd, and W[o]ty has decreed,
That Wit shall fall, and virtuous LANGHORNE bleed.

Peace to those Chiefs, tho' now combin'd they stand,
And deem themselves the Laureats of the Land;
Reason, from Prejudice and Passion free,
Will nobly just reverse their harsh Decree;
And to the Teeth of letter'd Impudence,
Assert the Cause of LANGHORNE and of Sense.