1768 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Judith Cowper Madan

William Cowper to Judith Cowper Madan, 28 June 1768; Correspondence, ed. Thomas Wright (1904) 1:103-04.



To Mrs. Madan, Stafford Row, near the Queen's Horse, Westminster

Olney, June 28, 1768.

DEAR AUNT,

I write once more to thank you on my own behalf and Mrs. Unwin's for negotiating this affair for us. John will be sent over to meet the maid at Newport on Saturday, and will bring her hither behind him.

I think I write to you with an aching heart upon my poor brother's account. He is with us, and his presence necessarily gives a turn to the conversation that we have not been used to. So much said about nothing, and so little said about Jesus, is very painful to us, but what call be done? May the good Lord make me thankful that He has given me, I trust, an understanding to know Him that is true, and may He in His due time afford me an occasion of thanking Him for the same unspeakable mercy bestowed upon my brother. He is going with us this evening to a prayer meeting at the vicarage, and we shall have two sermons preached here in the course of the week. Oh that his ears may be unstopped, and his eyes opened to the things that concern his peace.

My dear aunt, praise the Redeemer on my account, for teaching me and breaking the snares of the Enemy, and chastening me for my good. I have been much afflicted of late, and have been able to say with a burning heart, It is good for me that I was afflicted. I see plainly that the good Shepherd watches over me and keeps me every moment.

Yours ever in a kind and gracious Redeemer,

WM. COWPER.