1842 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

John Herman Merivale

John Anster to John Herman Merivale, 1842; Anna Wilhelmina Merivale, Family Memorials (1884) 368-69.



Yours appears to have been a singularly happy life, and in nothing more happy, as I gather not alone from your letters but from the few passages in your poems in which you allude to your family, than in every promise you could have made to yourself for your children being fulfilled to the utmost. It is, I know, absolutely impossible that I can say anything on the subject which must (perhaps to the exclusion of all others) engage your thoughts to which you could now listen, and I am almost afraid to suggest again your employing yourself, as you have lately been employed, with Schiller.... To how few is it given — to no one that I can remember at the moment — after such a professional life as yours, to return to such studies as have lately occupied you. I look with confidence to a translation of all that we can wish to have translated of Schiller — and this accomplished at a period when few would have the courage to learn a new language.