1814 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Andrew Marvell

Isaac D'Israeli, in Quarrels of Authors (1814) 2:203-04.



It was not only in these "pen combats" that this Literary Quarrel proceeded; it seems also to have broken out in the streets; for a tale has been preserved of a rencontre, which shews at once the brutal manners of [Samuel] PARKER and the exquisite wit of MARVELL. PARKER meeting MARVELL in the streets, the bully attempted to shove him from the wall; but, even there, MARVELL's agility contrived to lay him sprawling in the kennel; and, looking on him pleasantly, told him to "lie there for a son of a whore!" PARKER complained to the Bishop of Rochester, who immediately sent for MARVELL, to reprimand him; but he maintained that the Doctor has so called himself, in one of his recent publications; and pointing to the Preface, where PARKER declares he is "a true son of his mother the Church of England:" and if you read farther on, my Lord, you find he says "The Church of England has spawned two bastards, the Presbyterians and the Congregationalists; ergo, my Lord, he expressly declares that he is the son of a whore!"