1825 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

William Maginn

Anonymous, "Answer to O'Doherty's Farewell to Scotland" Morning Chronicle (3 February 1825).



Go, get thee gone, thou dastardly loon,
Go, get thee to thine own countrie;
If ever you cross the Border again,
The muckle diel accompany thee.
There's mony a tree in fair Scotland,
And there's ane, the gallows-tree,
On which we hang the Irish rogues,
A fitting place it is for thee.

Go, get thee gone, thou dastardly loon,
Too good for thee is brose and kale:—
We've lads and ladies gay in the land,
Bonny lasses, and nut-brown ale.
When thou goest to merry Carlisle,
Welcome take thy loud laughters three;
But know that the most of our beggarly clan
Came from the Holy Land, like thee.

Go, get thee gone, thou beggarly loon,
On thee our maidens refused to smile:—
Our pipers they scorn'd to beg from thee,
A half-starved knight of the Emerald Isle.
Go rather and herd thy father's pigs,
And feed on 'tatoes and butter-milk;
But return not to the princely North,
Land of the tartan, the bonnet, and kilt.
Blackwood's Magazine.