1786 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Christopher Anstey

Richard Graves, "To Christopher Anstey" 1786; Poetical Works of Christopher Anstey (1808) xlviiin.



"Ede tuos tandem populo Faustine libellos." Mart.

How long, my Friend, will, thus forlorn, remain
The lovely learned offspring of thy brain?
How long through all the town, thus vagrant roam?
Collect and bind them in one decent tome—
They long have gain'd thy native Cam's applause,
And brav'd old Oxford Johnson's rigid laws:
Fame stands attendant with thy wreath of bays,
Proud to augment thy well-earn'd meed of praise,
Why not admit the Goddess at thy door?
Why wait for glory, till thou'rt now no more?
Let thy own works, thy own last polish claim,
Nor trust to thy Executors for fame.
Too late, alas, the brightest honours come
Which Friendship's hand inscribes upon our tomb.