1780 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Bp. John Hinchliffe

Frances Burney, 1780; Diary and Letters of the Author of Madam D'Arblay, ed. Austin Dobson (1904-05) 1:372-74.



The next morning we had visitors pouring in to see us after our journey; but the two whose eagerness was infinitely most sincere, were the Bishop of Peterborough, who adores, and is adored in return by Mrs. Thrale, and the fair Augusta Byron, my romantically-partial young friend....

The bishop, in conversation, is indeed a most shining and superior man, — gay, high-spirited, manly, quick, and penetrating. I was seated, however, between the two Miss L—'s, and heard but little conversation besides their's and my own, — and which of the three afforded me most delight I have now no time to investigate....

The bishop and Mrs. Lambart dined with us, and stayed the afternoon, which was far more agreeable, lively, and sociable than when we before I last left Bath the bishop read to Mrs. T. and me a poem upon Hope, of the Duchess of Devonshire's, obtained with great difficulty from Lady Spencer. Well, this day he brought a tale called Anxiety, which he had almost torn from Lady Spencer, who is still here, to show to Mrs. Thrale; and, as before, he extended his confidence to me. It is a very pretty tale, and has in it as much entertainment as any tale upon so hackneyed a subject as an assembly of all the gods and goddesses to bestow gifts upon mankind, can be expected to give.