1793 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Edward Drewe

John Swete to Richard Polwhele, 1793; Polwhele, Traditions and Recollections (1826) 1:334-35.



I have been to day much shocked, having learnt (after morning service) from Mrs. Cooke, that our friend Drewe had been taken off by a fit of epilepsy. At the Society (Thursday se'nnight) he struck me as being astonishingly altered; he imputed the change in his appearance to a bad cold, which had confined him for some weeks. After he had left us, however (and he took himself off very early), Downman, Hole, and others, coincided in the opinion, that his looks were "ominous," and that they foreboded an early dissolution. He was, poor fellow! remarkably captious with —, and being sulky at our denying him a patient ear, expressed himself in some such manner aside to the President, and quitted us rather abruptly....

Yours very affectionately,

JOHN SWETE.