1767 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. Nathaniel Evans

Thomas Coombe, in "An Exercise performed at the public Commencement in the College of Philadelphia, November 17, 1767" Pennsylvania Gazette (26 November 1767).



POLLIO.
Yet ere we part, indulge the tender Tear,
Which bleeding Friendship sheds on STREPHON'S Bier.
The sweetest Warbler in the tuneful Train,
STREPHON is dead, and hush'd is Music's Strain.

EUDOSIUS.
Oft have we heard him trill his dulcet Lay,
Where yonder Woods their rural Shades display;
And while soft Transport held the wond'ring Throng,
Thy Streams, O Schuylkill, listen'd to his Song.

AMYNTOR.
Could Genius polish'd by the Smiles of Art,
Could gentle Manners, Sanctity of Heart,
A Life unspotted as the Vestal-Snow,
Fancy's warm Stroke, and Wisdom's steady Glow;
Could these prevail, or stay the venom'd Spear,
Then had not STREPHON ask'd this votive Tear.
But ah! good Heav'n, how intricate thy Ways,
In vain we strive to pierce the devious Maze;
Death gave the Word — the Cloud-drest Scene is o'er,
The WISE, the GOOD, the TUNEFUL is no more!—

POLLIO.
Then pour your Dirges o'er his hallow'd Urn,
Shall STREPHON die, and shall not MUSIC mourn!—

AIR.
Child of Anguish, weeping Care,
Haste thee from the dewy Sod,
Seek him in the azure Air,
Seek him in the Courts of GOD.
To golden Lutes your POET sings,
While prompting Angels wake the Strings!