1635 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Sir Francis Kynaston

Edward Foulis, "Upon that worthy Poet Sir Geofrey Chaucer, and Sir Francis Kinastons Translation" Kynaston, Amorum Troili et Creseidae (1635) sig. *4v.



True Poet! Who could words endue
With life, that makes the fiction true.
All passages are seene as cleare
As if not pend, but acted here:
Each thing so well demonstrated,
It comes to passe, when 'tis but read.

Here is no fault, but ours: through us
True Poetry growes barbarous:
While aged Language must be thought
(Because 'twas good long since) now naught.

Thus time can silence Chaucers tongue,
But not his witte, which now among
The Latines hath a lowder sound;
And what we lost, the World hath found.

Thus the Translation will become
Th' Originall, while that growes dumbe:
And this will crowne these labours: None
Sees Chaucer but in Kinaston.