1638 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Sir William Davenant

John Suckling, "To my Friend Will. Davenant" Davenant, Madagascar and other Poems (1638) sig. A5-A6.



UPON HIS POEM MADACASCAR.
What mighty Princes Poets are? those things
The great ones stick at, and our very Kings
Lay downe, they venture on; and with great ease,
Discover, conquer, what, and where they please.
Some Flegmatick Sea-Captaine, would have staid
For money now, or Victualls; not have waid
Anchor without 'em; Thou, (Will) do'st not stay
So much as for a Wind, but go'st away,
Land'st, View'st the Country; fight'st, put'st all to rout,
Before another cou'd be putting out!
And now the newes in towne is; Dav'nant's come
From Madagascar, Fraught with Laurell home,
And welcome (Will) for the first time, but prithee
In thy next Voyage, bring the Gold too with thee.

ON HIS OTHER POEMS.
Thou hast redeem'd us, Will; and future Times,
Shall not account unto the Age's crimes
Dearth of pure Wit: since the great Lord of it
(Donne) parted hence, no Man has ever writ
So neere him, in's owne way: I would commend
Particulars, but then, how should I end
Without a Volume? Ev'ry Line of thine
Would aske (to praise it right) Twenty of mine.