1788 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. Richard Polwhele

Thomas Pennant to Richard Polwhele, 1788; in Reminiscences in Prose and Verse (1836) 1:78-79.



1788.

Sir,

I shall remain in a glow until this letter reaches you, fearing your just censure for my not sooner acknowledging your very flattering favour of October 25th. By some strange delay it did not reach me till yesterday.

Accept my most grateful thanks for your very favourable opinion of me and my labours. I dare not commend your performance as it deserves, on account of its too great partiality; though I will say the lines are worthy of our best poets. Such is the sentiment of all near me.

Your address to the Cornish Traveller is quite a cordial; and almost reanimates me so far as to resume my pen for the public. I cannot think of publishing any thing except a piece (some time since ready) on London. Above 38 years ago, I visited Cornwall. My journey last Spring, was merely to show my son the western parts of England, before he went his second tour on the continent.

Yours truly,

T. PENNANT.