1823 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Alaric Alexander Watts

George Croly to Alaric Alexander Watts, 28 February 1823; in Alaric Alfred Watts, Alaric Watts, a Narrative of his Life, by his Son (1884) 1:164-65.



London, Feb. 28.

MY DEAR SIR,

Thanks for the newspapers. I like the vigour and direct application of your leading articles.

The extracts and literary notices place your work [The Leeds Intellegencer] above competition on the part of any country newspaper that I have seen. I can have no hesitation in my conviction of your success; but, I have some as to your directing that success to the best advantage to yourself. I wish to see your articles less calculated to involve you personally with the vagabonds about you. You have humour; humour is the best mode of disposing of an adversary, especially a political adversary. I wish to see your remarks and retorts in a more laughing and easy manner. Generally speaking, it is not worth any honest man's while to involve himself in ill-blood for the sake of either Tory or Whig. My only fear for you is private quarrel.

I know you will take these opinions as kindly as they are intended. Kind compliments to Mrs. Watts.

Believe me,

Very truly yours,

G. CROLY.