1638 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Robert Farley

H. M., "To the Author" Farley, Kalendarium Humanae Vitae (1638) sig. A4.



Some use to flatter worth by too much Praise;
Who rather doe detract than give him Bayes,
Who merits it: And some againe betray
(Like some course Prologue to a courser Play)
The Authors Subject; both are bad: but I
Will none of both: rather I will belye
Desert, and say this Poeme speakes thee vaine:
For to speake truth, I'm angry with thy Straine;
For that it is so short: (though sweete) expect,
Ile taxe thee alwayes with that small defect.
Yet (out of Policie) perhaps thy Lyre
Thou layd'st aside so soone, least we Expire;
And the chiefe cause proceede from thence: For 'tis
Certaine, as too much griefe is mortall, so of blisse.
All I will say, is, my beleefe is such
That after-times will thanke thee for this touch:
And such my Charity, I wish it may
Out live the last, and longest Summers day,
And that this present Age, may please to give
It pleasant smiles; and helpe its Hope to live.