1584 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Sir Philip Sidney

Thomas Lodge, "To the right worshipfull, Sir Philips Sidney Knight" An Alarum against Usurers (1584) sig. Aii.



It is not (noble Gentleman) the titles of Honour that allureth me, nor the nobilitie of your Parents that induceth me, but the admiration of your vertues that perswadeth me, to publish my pore travailes under your undoubted protection. Whom I most humbly intreate, not onely in so just a cause to protect me, but also in these Primordia of my studies, after the accustomed prudence of the Philosophers, to confirme with favourable acceptaunce, and continuance as the equitie of the cause requireth. I have set downe in these fewe lines in my opinion (Right Worshipfull) the image of a licentious Usurer, and the collusions of divelish incrochers, and heereunto was I led by two reasons: First, that the offender seeing his owne counterfaite in this Mirrour; might amend it, and those who are like by overlavish profusenesse, to become meate for their mouths, might be warned by this caveat to shunne the Scorpion ere she devoureth.

May it please your Worshippe, to favour my travailes, and to accept my good will: who incouraged by the successe of this my firstlings will heereafter in most humble signe of humanitie continue the purpose I have begunne, commending the cause and my service to your good liking: who no doubt compassed with incomperable vertues, will commend when you see occasion, and not condemne without a cause.

Your Worships in all dutie to commaund,

Thomas Lodge.