1836 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Charles Fox

Richard Polwhele, in Reminiscences in Prose and Verse (1836) 2:182.



Fox's house at Falmouth was burnt to the ground. To enjoy the conflagration, Fox, another Nero, ascended the roof of the opposite house; and, whilst the quaker was contemplating the sublime spectacle — not indeed with the feelings of the emperor, but with the calmness of a philosopher — his friend Wolcot saved the horses in the stable, by muffling up their heads in blankets. We know, horses from the glare of fire remain immovable, and are thus burnt to death.