1600 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

John Weever

I. F., in Weever, Faunus and Melliflora (1600) Sig. A4.



Methinks I heare some foule-mouth'd Momus say,
What have we here? a shepheards roundelay?
More love-tricks yet? will this geare never end,
But slight lascivious toyes must still be pend?
Content thee Momus, thou hast lost thy sight,
For this is niether vaine, obsceane, nor slight.

If for to write of Love and Loves delights,
Be not fit objects for the graver sights,
Then stil admired Chaucer, thou maist rue
And write thy auntient stories all anew:
And that same Fayry Muse may rise againe,
To blot those works that with us do remaine.

Then feare not Weever, let thy Muse go on,
Thy maiden Muse, thy chaste Endimeon:
To blazon forth the love of shepheard swaines,
As well in Cottage as in Court love raines.
And whosoever shall chance thy booke to see,
In it shall reade ripe wit, sweet Poetrie.