1622 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

John Taylor the Water Poet

Richard Hatton, in Taylor, An Arrant Thiefe, whom every Man may trust (1622) sig. A2.



This Water Rat, (or Art) I would commend,
But that I know not to begin or end:
He read his Verses to me, and which more is
Did move my Muse to write Laudem Authoris,
If for his Land Discoveries she should praise him,
Whether would then his liquid knowledge raise him?
Reade his two Treatises of Theefe and Whore,
Youle thinke it time for him to leave his Oare.
Yet thus much of his worth I cannot smother,
'Tis well for us when Theeves peach one another.
The Preface is but poore, 'tis by a Boy done,
That is a Scholler of the School of Croydon,
Who when he hath more yeares and learning got,
Hee'l praise him more or lesse, or not a jot.

Given upon Shrove Tuesday from
our seate, in the second Forme
of the famous free Schoole of
Croydon.
By RICHARD HATTON.