1700 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Thomas Brown

Daniel Kenrick, in A New Session of the Poets (1700) 4.



Rim—r at this, and Den—s too sate down,
And in their stead stood up late-bruis'd Tom Br—n:
While with the Rake, the more to raise his Fame,
The Spanish Lass, and Senior Gaya came;
With many a Bold, unlicensed Interloper,
And in the Rear march't honest Abel Rop—r.
Pin'd to his Back were Rhymes without a Name,
Which oft had purchas'd him both Blows, and Fame.
For whatsoe're was scandalously writ,
No Author known, Tom's Carcass paid for it:
Who pray'd Apollo to reward his Lays,
And to much Birch to add a little Bays.
Oh Heav'ns, cry'd out Apollo, grant me patience!
Must I thus still be teiz'd with damn'd Translations?
An Author can't in French, or Spanish prate,
But you must make this Sot speak English straight!
As if within this lewd licentious Town,
We'd not enow vile Authors of our own!
Then told him, that he did not now Translate,
As heretofore, for Glory, but to Eat:
That Bards should never offer at the Bays,
That often Dine but once in twice two days.