1700 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Nahum Tate

Daniel Kenrick, in A New Session of the Poets (1700) 9-10.



At this a Bard that had Usurp't the Bays
E're since that Dearth of Wit, Mac Fleckno's Days,
Resolv'd to lay the dubious Title down,
And from Apollo only hold his Crown.
Some Annual Odes, Hymns, Elegies, and Psalms,
Besides a Play, were all that fill'd his Palms:
Apollo view'd him stript of all his State,
And by his Modesty soon knew Nat T—te:
Then smiling said, that whatsoe're he wrote
Was always smooth, nor sometimes wanted Thought;
But swore with Passion by the Lake call'd Stygian,
No Laureat e're should meddle with Religion:
In this, said he, my Dryden's self was out,
Who still wrote worse, the more he grew Devout.
The Spotted Panther thus brought Brindle Praise;
One got the Gold, and t' other lost the Bays.