1733 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

John Gay

Anonymous, "The Patriot turned Poet: or, Pulteney no Ballad-Maker" Daily Courant (21 February 1733).



SIR,
As I've been very well informed that Mr. P—y wrote most of the Songs in the Opera of Achilles, pray insert the following Lines. The Charge of Obscenity, tho' it is strictly denied, if they dare print it, shall be made good.

P—t—y, in vain, to make thy Poet live,
Thou mak'st him borrow Fame, he us'd to give.
Vain would thy Muse, in Numbers sweet yet strong,
Turn the smart Epigram, or point the Song:
But, striving Gay's unfinish'd Scenes to save,
You blast the Poet's Laurels o'er his Grave.
Too dang'rous Friend; if thus by Friendship led,
To shew you lov'd him living, wound him dead.
By this one Act thy matchless Worth we see:
For P—t—y who with him compar'd can be?
Who with his Love a pois'nous Taint instils?
Whose Hate is harmless, but whose Friendship kills?