1734 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. Joseph Trapp

Anonymous, "On a Jacobite Parson and Poet. To the Rev. Dr. T—" Daily Courant (13 June 1734).



Thy Duty is a steady Thing,
Dear Joseph, Christian Brother,
Praying each Sunday for one King,
And Writing for another.

Both to commend at once to Heaven,
Have Parsons, Joe, such Tricks?
While George has one poor Day in seven,
And James the other Six.

The Dividend had been more fair,
And both had just their Right,
If one each Morn, had had his Prayer,
And t' other his at Night:

But yet to neither thou dost Wrong,
While each enjoys his Part;
The British Sovereign has thy Tongue,
The King at Rome thy Heart.

As thus to Both you Succours lend,
Sure neither can repine!
One has the Poet for his Friend,
And one has the Divine.

Your Wisdom sooths each harsh Debate
That Whig and Tories move!
A Collect for the King you hate,
An Ode for him you love.

Your Wisdom sooths each harsh Debate
That Whig and Tories move!
A Collect for the King you hate,
An Ode for him you love.

You Conscience, far more Wise and Wide,
Does mine, dear Friend, outdo;
I to One King, alas! am ty'd,
While thou hast Choice of Two.