1781 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. Isaac Watts

T. N., "Impromptu, on viewing a Monument in Westminster Abbey, erected to the Memory of the celebrated Dr. Isaac Watts" Gazetteer and New Daily Advertiser (30 November 1781).



Hah, WATTS! with rapture I behold thy bust,
Thy venerable shade this fane adorn;
Thy learned, useful labours all admire,
And ev'ry tribe of Britons thee esteem.
No party zealot, bigot to no sect,
Philanthropy's expanded flame was thine.
Devoted was thy life to useful study,
For man's improvement and his happiness:
Thy fine thoughts, cloth'd in elegance of stile,
Support the weak, strengthen the feeble mind,
Instruct th' untutor'd, and confirm the wise.
High literary glory, WATTS, was thine,
And that's the summit of all human fame.
Thy talents with humility were crown'd;
Thy soul serene, and happy in itself:
With candour grac'd, no sect you e'er condemn'd.
This much-lov'd pile, this venerable fane,
Where many fav'rite British worthies rest,
The gen'ral wish was, that thy tomb should grace—
Thy mausoleum, friend, to merit rais'd,
Honour'd themselves, because they honour'd thee.