1784 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Bp. Richard Hurd

Anonymous, "On the Addition of a Library to the Episcopal House at Hartlebury, in Worcestershire" Gazetteer and New Daily Advertiser (9 December 1784).



Thus Phoebus to Minerva said:—
"By Hurd in all things we're obey'd;
Not Socrates, however fervent,
Was more than Hurd your humble servant.

"Genius and taste from me he drew,
But martial dignity from you;
Now, with propriety refin'd,
He manifests a grateful mind.

"Behold the hoary, gothic seat,
Which rises in that green retreat!
To us a votive Temple there
Is finish'd, by his filial care.
Whate'er in literature is best,
The various treasures of the East,
The eloquence of Greece and Rome,
Shall dignify the spacious dome.
Whate'er in learning's common-weal,
Of modern date, hath had our seal,
Shall to this venerable
Thro' Hurd, a free admission gain;
Hence (whom we deem our special care)
Each British genius shall be there.
There Locke and Newton claim your smile,
And Bacon, glory of the isle;
There, chiefs of the poetic band,
My Shakespear and my Milton stand;
And Clarendon, with sterner pride,
Shall o'er th' historic ranks preside:
Thus, fill'd with all that's good and great,
The votive fane shall stand compleat."

The maid replied — "If in our shrine
His modest merit should assign
To his own works a station due,
Your observation would be true."