1826 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

John Nichols

John Taylor Esq., "Epitaph on the late J. Nichols, Esq." Gentleman's Magazine 96 (December 1826) 504.



Here Nichols rests, whose pure and active mind
Thro' life still aim'd to benefit mankind.
For useful knowledge eager from his youth,
To lengthen'd age in keen pursuit of Truth.
What ruthless time had destin'd to decay,
He well explor'd and brought to open day.
Yet still he search'd not with a Bigot's zeal
To gain what Time would for Oblivion steal,
But that such works recorded should remain
As taste and virtue gladly would retain.
And though intent to merit public fame,
Warmly alive to each domestic claim:
He like the Patriarchs rever'd of yore,
To all his kindred due affection bore.
Prompt with good humour all he knew to cheer,
And wit with him was playful, not severe,
Such was the Sage whose reliques rest below,
Belov'd by many a friend, without one foe.